Physicists and religion

  • Imagine you are sipping tea or coffee while discussing various issues with a broad and diverse network of students, colleagues, and friends brought together by the common bond of physics, graduate school, and the physics GRE.

a bucket
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:02 am

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by a bucket » Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:05 pm

sidharthsp wrote:For the sake of example, poets John Milton, Kahlil Gibran, Rabindranath Tagore [nobel prize in literature 1913] have composed beautiful poetry, often inspired by religous symbols and concept of god.
Poetry is boring, pointless and unproductive. People who have time to write poetry should spend in on something more worthwhile.
sidharthsp wrote:As I see, it is more of a statistical phenomenon. Some people take good stuffs from religion and some people take bad or do bad, all for the cause of religion [and some god whom no one has seen yet - the irony :) ].
Unfortunately most people take the bad.

a bucket
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:02 am

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by a bucket » Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:20 pm

sonikajohri wrote:Yes, it is wonderful. You are as narrow-minded and rigid as any religious bigot when you refuse to accept different points of view.
Statistically since we have exactly no information about the existence of a supreme conscience, any theory about a god is equally likely to be correct. Given the sheer number of theories connected with religions, the probability of any given theory being correct is approximately 1/(10^4). Therefore any given belief you refuse to accept is probably wrong anyway and personally I can't be bothered to waste my time looking for a needle in a haystack.

User avatar
twistor
Posts: 1530
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 2:47 pm

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by twistor » Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:12 am

For the sake of example, poets John Milton, Kahlil Gibran, Rabindranath Tagore [nobel prize in literature 1913] have composed beautiful poetry, often inspired by religous symbols and concept of god.
I happen to like the poetry and writings of Kahlil Gibran and it doesn't matter to me whether or not they were inspired by his belief in deity or something else. The fact that people are inspired by religious imagery does not prove the existence of god.

User avatar
twistor
Posts: 1530
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 2:47 pm

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by twistor » Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:14 am

a bucket wrote:
twistor wrote:Hinduism is no better than any other religion.
Never claimed it was. I was just stating an observation. IMO all religions except the Church of emacs are boring as hell.
Praise be its power to perform vertical cut and paste.

vicente
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 12:24 am

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by vicente » Fri Mar 20, 2009 1:57 pm

In defense of sonikajohri, Hinduism (and Judaism) are not strictly religions in the sense that Protestant Christianity is, where you have to believe certain doctrines to be part of it. It has a large cultural component one can identify with without believing in any of the supernatural stuff. You can be an atheist and Hindu / Jewish but you can't be an atheist Christian.

The concern I'm having is with physicists who believe dogmatically in supernatural statements that contradict peer-reviewed science and still want to be taken seriously as physicists.

Whether religion is a positive or negative force in society is another story.

sonikajohri
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Aug 28, 2008 2:01 pm

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by sonikajohri » Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:15 pm

a bucket wrote:
sidharthsp wrote:For the sake of example, poets John Milton, Kahlil Gibran, Rabindranath Tagore [nobel prize in literature 1913] have composed beautiful poetry, often inspired by religous symbols and concept of god.
Poetry is boring, pointless and unproductive. People who have time to write poetry should spend in on something more worthwhile.
sidharthsp wrote:As I see, it is more of a statistical phenomenon. Some people take good stuffs from religion and some people take bad or do bad, all for the cause of religion [and some god whom no one has seen yet - the irony :) ].
Unfortunately most people take the bad.
Actually you are quite wrong there, most people take the good. Its just that the bad make the news.

sonikajohri
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Aug 28, 2008 2:01 pm

Re: Physicists and religion

Post by sonikajohri » Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:22 pm

a bucket wrote:
sonikajohri wrote:Yes, it is wonderful. You are as narrow-minded and rigid as any religious bigot when you refuse to accept different points of view.
Statistically since we have exactly no information about the existence of a supreme conscience, any theory about a god is equally likely to be correct. Given the sheer number of theories connected with religions, the probability of any given theory being correct is approximately 1/(10^4). Therefore any given belief you refuse to accept is probably wrong anyway and personally I can't be bothered to waste my time looking for a needle in a haystack.
1. Just to be clear on one point, I don't connect God, supreme conscience to religion.
2. What I mean by my comment is - No one's forcing you to believe in anything, and neither should you expect that everyone should share your views and think exactly the way you think and like the things you like and in general be clones of you.



Post Reply